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Gastric suction

Definition

Gastric suction is a procedure to empty the contents of your stomach.

Alternative Names

Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction

How the test is performed

A tube is inserted through the nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Sometimes you may be given a numbing medicine to reduce irritation and gagging caused by the tube.

Stomach contents can be removed using suction right away or after spraying water through the tube.

How to prepare for the test

In an emergency, such as when a patient has swallowed poison or is vomiting blood, no preparation is needed for gastric suction.

If gastric suction is being done for testing, your doctor may ask you not to eat overnight or to stop taking certain medications.

How the test will feel

You may feel a gagging sensation as the tube is passed.

Why the test is performed

This test may be done to:

  • Remove poisons, harmful materials, or excess medications from the stomach
  • Clean the stomach before an upper endoscopy (EGD ) if you have been vomiting blood
  • Collect stomach acid
  • Relieve pressure if you have a blockage in the intestines

Normal Values

What abnormal results mean

What the risks are

Risks may include:

  • Breathing in contents from the stomach (this is called aspiration)
  • Hole (perforation) in the esophagus
  • Tube may be placed into the airway instead of the esophagus
  • Minor bleeding

Special considerations

References

Greene S, Harris C, Singer J. Gastrointestinal decontamination of the poisoned patient. . 2008;24:176-178.

Encyclopedia content is provided as information only and not intended to replace the advice and instruction from your personal physician.