Search

Hematocrit

Definition

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

The hematocrit is almost always ordered as part of a complete blood count .

Alternative Names

HCT

How the test is performed

A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

How to prepare for the test

No special preparation is necessary for this test.

How the test will feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

Why the test is performed

Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of:

  • Anemia
  • Diet deficiency
  • Leukemia
  • Other medical condition

Normal Values

Normal results vary, but in general are as follows:

  • Male: 40.7 - 50.3%
  • Female: 36.1 - 44.3%

Normal value ranges vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

The examples above show the common measurements for results for these tests. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different samples.

What abnormal results mean

Low hematocrit may be due to:

  • Anemia
  • Bleeding
  • Destruction of red blood cells
  • Leukemia
  • Malnutrition
  • Nutritional deficiencies of iron, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6
  • Overhydration

High hematocrit may be due to:

What the risks are

Veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight but may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling light-headed
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

References

Bunn HF. Approach to the anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. . 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 161. 

Encyclopedia content is provided as information only and not intended to replace the advice and instruction from your personal physician.