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Mammogram - calcifications

Definition

Calcifications are tiny deposits of calcium in your breast tissue. They are often seen on a mammogram .

Alternative Names

Calcifications on mammograms

Information

The calcium you eat or take in medicine does not cause calcifications in the breast.

Most calcifications are not a sign of cancer. Other causes of calcifications on a mammogram include:

  • Calcium deposits in the arteries inside your breasts
  • History of breast infection
  • Noncancerous (benign) breast lumps or cysts
  • Past injury to the breast tissue
  • Powders, deodorants, or ointments that are placed on the skin

Large rounded calcifications (macrocalcifications) are common in women over age 50. They appear as small white dots on the mammogram. They are not thought to be related to cancer, and only rarely need more testing.

Microcalcifications are tiny calcium specks seen on a mammogram. Most of the time, they are not cancer, but may need to be checked more closely.

WHEN IS FURTHER TESTING NEEDED?

When microcalcifications are seen on a mammogram, the doctor (a radiologist) may ask for a magnified view so the calcifications can be seen more closely.

Calcifications that do not appear to be a problem are called “benign.” No specific follow-up is needed.

Calcifications are slightly abnormal but do not look like a problem are called “probably benign.” Usually, a 6-month mammogram is recommended.

Calcifications that are irregular in size or shape, or tightly clustered together, are called "suspicious calcifications." Your health care provider will recommend a stereotactic core biopsy . This is a needle biopsy that uses a type of mammogram machine to help find the calcifications.

Most patients who have suspicious calcifications do not have cancer.

References

Bartella L, Smith CS, Dershaw DD, Liberman L. Imaging breast cancer. . 2007 Jan;45(1):45-67.

James JJ, Robin A, Wilson M, Evans AJ. The breast. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 52.

Muss HB. Breast cancer and differential diagnosis of benign lesions. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 208.

Encyclopedia content is provided as information only and not intended to replace the advice and instruction from your personal physician.