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We Offer the Latest Treatment for Heartburn and Other Stomach Conditions

Heartburn/GERD Diagnostic Procedures 

Barrx Procedure
Bravo pH Study
EGD (gastroscopy)
EGD with Dilation

Barrx Procedure
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (also known as a Gastroscopy) with Ablation (Barrx) 

What is an EGD?
An EGD is an endoscopic examination of the lining of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). A slender, flexible, fiberoptic tube is inserted into the mouth and advanced into the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. 

What to expect:
Before your exam the nurse will ask detailed questions regarding your current and past medical history. You will receive sedation prior to the procedure. You will not be able to eat or drink for four to eight (4-8) hours prior to the procedure. Oral high blood pressure and cardiac medications are often allowed with a sip of water. You will need a responsible adult to drive you home. 

Once in the procedure room, your blood pressure, cardiac rhythm, pulse, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation will be monitored continuously. You will be asked to lie on your left side and intravenous sedation will be given. The procedure will last about 30 minutes. 

What is an Ablation?
Abnormal tissue can develop in the lower end of the esophagus, often as a result of acid reflux. A procedure called an ablation is used to eliminate this abnormal tissue and allow for the re-growth of normal esophageal lining. A probe is passed through the scope and inflated to the circumference of the esophagus. The gastroenterologist views the tissue and applies energy to the probe. This destroys the abnormal tissue. Diet adjustment and pain medication are prescribed for the first few days after the procedure. It may be repeated from time to time until the abnormal tissue is completely removed. 

Meet the professionals:
Gastroenterologists are physicians who specialize in performing endoscopic procedures. They have completed several years of advanced training and appropriate certification after completing their medical degrees. A Registered Nurse with specialized endoscopy training will assist the gastroenterologist. He or she will also help you prior to and after the procedure. 

After the exam:
Your blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate and level of pain will be assessed every 15 minutes for up to one hour after the procedure. The physician will be able to tell you what was seen when you are awake. 

If allowed, you will be given sips of water to drink when you are awake enough to swallow. Your diet will be advanced per your physician’s orders. 

If you have any questions, ask your physician or call 480-323-3820. 

Bravo pH Study

What is a Bravo pH Study?
A Bravo pH study measures the amount of acid that backs up into the esophagus from the stomach. 

What to expect:
This procedure is normally performed as an outpatient. The study is conducted using the Bravo receiver. This is a unit that you will use at home or in your daily routine for a period of 48 hours. If it needs to be completed while you are still in the hospital, you will be taken to the Endoscopy Department. The physician will determine whether you should take your reflux or heartburn medications prior to the procedure. 

Before your exam, the nurse will ask detailed questions regarding your current and past medical history. He or she will insert an IV and make sure it is working properly. You will need to fast for at least four hours. Check with your doctor to see if you can take your oral high blood pressure and cardiac medications with a sip of water. 

Once in the procedure room, your blood pressure, cardiac rhythm, pulse, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation will be continuously monitored. You will be asked to lie on your left side and intravenous sedation will be given. The procedure will last approximately five minutes. Small (size of a pin head) biopsies may be taken. These are not painful. The Bravo capsule will then be attached to the lower esophagus. It will remain here for about five to seven days. After that time, it will fall off and pass through your digestive track. You do not need to retrieve the capsule. 

The nurse will give you very specific instructions on the care and operation of the Bravo receiver. You will also be instructed to maintain a 48-hour diary. In it, you will list: 

  • Your intake of food and drink 
  • What times you lie down 

You will be instructed as to where and when to return the diary and the receiver at the completion of the 48 hours. At the end of the 48 hours, the receiver will stop accepting information and the screen will go blank. 

Meet the professionals:
Gastroenterologists
are physicians who specialize in performing endoscopic procedures. They have completed several years of advanced training and appropriate certification after completing their medical degrees. A Registered Nurse with specialized endoscopy training will assist the gastroenterologist in performing the procedure. He or she will also assist you prior to and after the procedure. 

After the exam:
Your blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate and level of pain will be assessed every 15 minutes for up to one hour after the procedure. The physician will be able to tell you what he or she saw when you are awake. Processing biopsy results may take up to three days. 

If allowed, you will be given sips of water when you are awake enough to swallow. Your diet will be given per your physician’s orders. 

The instructions for the use and maintenance of the Bravo receiver will be reviewed with your family prior to discharge. It is imperative that the recorder be returned to Endoscopy when your study is completed. Allow approximately one week before calling your physician for results. 

If you have any questions, ask your physician or call 480-882-4805 Osborn, 480-323-3820 Shea.

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (also known as a Gastroscopy)

What is an EGD?
An EGD is an endoscopic examination of the lining of the esophagus, stomach and the first portion of the small intestine (duodenum). A slender, flexible fiberoptic tube is inserted into the mouth and advanced into the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. 

What to expect:
Before your exam, the nurse will ask detailed questions regarding your current and past medical history. You will receive sedation prior to the procedure. You will not be able to eat or drink for four to eight (4-8) hours prior to the procedure. Oral high blood pressure and cardiac medications are often allowed with a sip of water. You will need a responsible adult to drive you home. 

Once in the procedure room, your blood pressure, cardiac rhythm, pulse, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation will be monitored continuously. You will be asked to lie on your left side and intravenous sedation will be given. The procedure will last about five minutes. Small biopsies (the size of a pin head) may be taken. These are not painful. 

Meet the professionals:
Gastroenterologists
are physicians who specialize in performing endoscopic procedures. They have completed several years of advanced training and appropriate certification after completing their medical degrees. A Registered Nurse with specialized endoscopy training will assist the gastroenterologist. He or she will also help you prior to and after the procedure. 

After the exam:
Your blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate and level of pain will be assessed every 15 minutes for up to one hour after the procedure. The physician will be able to tell you what was seen when you are awake. Biopsy results may take up to three days for a result. 

If allowed, you will be given sips of water to drink when you are awake enough to swallow. Your diet will be advanced per your physician’s orders. 

If you have any questions, ask your physician or call 480-882-4805 Osborn, 480-323-3820 Shea.

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Dilation (also known as a Gastroscopy)

What is an EGD with Dilation?
An EGD is an endoscopic examination of the lining of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). A slender, flexible, fiberoptic tube is inserted into the mouth and advanced into the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. Dilation is the passage of a tapered catheter or balloon that is used to stretch a stricture. The stricture may be in the esophagus or at the opening of the stomach into the duodenum. Strictures are narrowed areas within the gastrointestinal tract. These narrowed areas can slow or stop the passage of food or food byproducts. Strictures consist of scar tissue related to acid reflux or surgical procedures. 

What to expect:
Before your exam, the nurse will ask detailed questions regarding your current and past medical history. He/she will start an IV. You will receive sedation prior to the procedure. You will not be able to eat or drink for four to eight (4-8) hours prior to your procedure. Heart and blood pressure medications may be taken with a sip of water, prior to the procedure. You will need a responsible adult to drive you home. 

Once in the procedure room, your blood pressure, cardiac rhythm, pulse, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation will be continuously monitored. You will be asked to lie on your left side and intravenous sedation will be given. The procedure will last approximately five minutes. Small biopsies (the size of a pin head) may be taken. These are not painful. 

Meet the professionals:
Gastroenterologists
are physicians who specialize in performing endoscopic procedures. They have completed several years of advanced training and appropriate certification after completing their medical degrees. A Registered Nurse with specialized endoscopy training will assist the gastroenterologist in performing the procedure. He or she will also assist you prior to and after the procedure. 

After the exam:
Your blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate and level of pain will be assessed every 15 minutes for up to one hour after the procedure. The physician will be able to tell you what was seen when you are awake. Biopsy results may take up to three days for a result. 

If allowed, you will be given sips of water to drink when you are awake enough to swallow. Your diet will be advanced per your physician’s orders. You may see blood tinged mucus immediately following the procedure. Small amounts are normal, but larger amounts of blood may be cause for concern. If you see large amounts of blood or clots, contact your physician immediately. 

If you have any questions, ask your physician or call one of our Endoscopy Units:

 

Osborn Medical Center 480-882-4805 

Shea Medical Center 480-323-3820

Thompson Peak Hospital 480-324-7301