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Dissolving stent restores blood flow to heart
Dissolving stent restores blood flow to heart
A dissolvable stent that opens clogged arteries in the heart has researchers at Scottsdale Healthcare encouraged that it may become a game changing technology for treating the symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common type of heart disease. Interventional cardiologist David Rizik, MD is the first physician in the western U.S. to successfully implant the investigational device into a heart patient as part of a new clinical trial enrolling patients at Scottsdale Healthcare. The Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS), made by healthcare company Abbott, is a small mesh tube made of polylactide, a material that is commonly used in medical implants such as dissolvable sutures. Absorb is coated with a medication which reduces inflammation and tissue growth to help prevent renarrowing of the artery. The scaffold restores blood flow and provides support to the vessel until the artery can stay open on its own. It dissolves over time, potentially allowing the vessel to resume more natural function and movement. The clinical trial is evaluating potential benefits of Absorb in comparison to the leading metallic drug eluting stent in patients with CAD, the most common cause of death for men and women in the United States. Absorb is authorized for sale in CE Mark countries and is available in Europe, the Middle East, parts of Latin America, and parts of Asia Pacific, including India, Hong Kong, Malaysia and New Zealand. "The bioresorbable scaffold represents a potential game changing technology for our patients with coronary artery disease," said Dr. Rizik. "The idea of moving away from permanent metal implants to literally disappearing implants is a quantum leap forward for our heart patients at Scottsdale Healthcare. The cardiology team of physicians, nursing staff and clinicians are extremely pleased to participate in the trial of this latest advancement to our community." Heart disease facts • Each year, about 785,000 Americans have a first heart attack. • Another 470,000 who have already experienced one or more heart attacks will have another. • Heart disease accounts for one of every six deaths that take place in the U.S. Patients with CAD can experience symptoms such as chest pain and shortness of breath when the demand for blood to the heart is more than the heart's ability to supply blood due to blockages in the vessels that supply blood to the heart. These blockages are caused by the buildup of fat and cholesterol inside the vessel. Since the 1970s, physicians have treated CAD patients with less invasive treatment options such as balloon angioplasty, metallic and drug eluting metallic stents, allowing many patients to avoid open heart surgery. The ABSORB III clinical trial will enroll approximately 2,250 patients, the majority in the United States. Abbott started development of Absorb about a decade ago. Absorb has been implanted in patients from 40 countries worldwide in clinical trials and commercial settings. For more information about enrolling in this clinical trial, contact the Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute at 480-323-3437 or email heartclinicaltrials@shc.org
Colon cancer prevention: 50 and Fearless
Colon cancer prevention: 50 and Fearless
Whether it's fear of the prep, the procedure or potential results, colonoscopy could be a lifesaver when detecting colon cancer, the second leading cancer killer in the U.S. That's why Scottsdale Healthcare launched its http://50andfearless.org/ health education campaign. Although a screening colonoscopy is recommended starting at age 50, if there is a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, screenings should begin at age 40. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that up to 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women age 50 years and older were routinely screened. Visit http://50andfearless.org/ and share the #50andFearless badge on social media to show you're ready to live more and fear less by getting a screening colonoscopy. According to the American Cancer Society: • Colon cancer is the second leading cancer killer for men and women in the U.S. • 1 in 20 have a lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer • 102,480 new diagnoses of colon cancer are expected in 2013 • 50,830 colon cancer deaths expected during 2013 • There are 1 million colorectal cancer survivors in the U.S. thanks to early detection and treatment
50 Years in Pictures
50 Years in Pictures
Scottsdale Healthcare is celebrating its 50th Anniversary during May 2012. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center was welcomed into the community with an open house held on Mother's Day in 1962 for the new City Hospital of Scottsdale, as it was named at the time. Starting with the original Auxiliary members and early days of the hospital, through the addition of the Shea and Thompson Peak hospitals, to our Magnet designation, enjoy these photos from our first 50 years of making history, caring for you! Learn more about Scottsdale Healthcare by visiting http://shc.org
50 and Fearless
50 and Fearless
Are you 50 and Fearless? March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month -- studies show that fear is the #1 reason people don't get a colonoscopy. This simple procedure can be a lifesaver and is recommended starting at age 50, or earlier if you have a family history of colon cancer or polyps. Visit http://50andFearless.org to learn more, or call 480-323-3801.

Active Heart: Tracy's Story
Active Heart: Tracy's Story
Born with a heart murmur, Tracy Cruickshank began seeing a cardiologist when she was just six months old. Because she was asymptomatic, Tracy lived a very active lifestyle that included cycling, snowboarding and power yoga. At 40 years old, she felt great. Then a routine check-up with her cardiologist revealed an aortic aneurysm—and the need for open heart surgery. Tracy was treated by Scottsdale Healthcare cardiac surgeon Robert Riley, MD for a bicuspid aortic valve with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta. According to Dr. Riley, Tracy was born with the condition, a common one that typically progresses over time to the point where the valve needs to be replaced. Eight weeks after surgery, Tracy began to resume the activities she loves. "Tracy has clearly demonstrated that you can return to normal life after major open heart surgery and valve replacement," said Dr. Riley. To learn more about Scottsdale Healthcare Heart & Vascular Services, visit http://www.shc.org/heart, email Heartinfo@shc.org or call 480-323-3663.
Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?
Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?
Are you at risk? 1 in 3 adult deaths each year are caused by heart disease and stroke. Schedule a free heart health assessment* at Scottsdale Healthcare in addition to your annual physical. Free screening appointments are available Feb. 7 - March 16. To know your risk factors or schedule an assessment, visit http://www.loweryourheartrisk.org/ *Availability is limited.
TAVR procedure Hybrid OR
TAVR procedure Hybrid OR
Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center's new Hybrid Operating Room allows new procedure such as nonsurgical heart valve replacement. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is the first in Arizona to perform the Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) procedure, which was recently approved by the FDA. TAVR is significant because it does not require open heart surgery, giving hope for heart patients with inoperable aortic stenosis (failing heart valves). A catheter fed through the femoral artery is used to implant the Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve, which recently received approval for commercial use in the U.S. The state-of-the-art, 800-sq. ft. Hybrid OR combines the latest surgical, cardiac catheterization and 3-D radiologic imaging technologies with real-time patient monitoring to allow the most complicated procedures without moving the patient for specialized procedures. The patient stays in place with the interventional cardiologist, electrophysiologist or interventional radiologist and heart and vascular surgeon all working side by side. Patients interested in learning more about the TAVR procedure can call the Scottsdale Healthcare Heart Valve Clinic Coordinator at 480-323-3459 or email HeartInfo@shc.org.
Dr. Daniel Von Hoff Cancer Research at Scottsdale Healthcare
Dr. Daniel Von Hoff Cancer Research at Scottsdale Healthcare
Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, chief scientific officer at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, was keynote speaker at a recent special edition Scottsdale Mayor and Council Breakfast. Dr. Von Hoff's presentation focused on the strides against cancer made at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center through its Phase I clinical trials and collaborations with TGen and other research partners. For more information about the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, visit http://www.shc.org/cancer. For information about specific clinical trials currently open at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, call 1-877-273-3713 or email clinicaltrials@shc.org. Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/SHCpublicinfo and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/scottsdalehealthcare.

Trauma center participates in USAF Angel Thunder exercise
Trauma center participates in USAF Angel Thunder exercise
Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is expecting increased air evac flights on April 13, 2013 when the hospital participates in Resolute Angel, a U.S. Air Force search-and-rescue and medical evacuation exercise. Resolute Angel will test local, state and federal organizations with a mock catastrophic, mass-casualty event reaching from the Grand Canyon to the New Mexico/Arizona border. The exercise is part of Angel Thunder 2013, the world's largest personnel recovery exercise, integrating sister services and numerous state, national, multinational and interagency assets dedicated to saving lives in incredible circumstances. Participation in Angel Thunder is part of Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center's continuing readiness training for response to a major regional disaster. Normal hospital operations will continue and patient care is not expected to be affected as the simulated victims are airlifted to Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn's Level I Trauma Center. Scottsdale Healthcare has participated in previous Angel Thunder and other regional exercises to practice its disaster response capabilities and procedures in collaboration with military, federal, state and local agencies. The Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership provides military medical personnel with training, education, skills and experience needed to perform successfully in combat and humanitarian missions while building relationships that can be used in potential disaster response situations. For more information on the Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership, visit http://www.shc.org/militarytraining.
LipiScan Coronary Imaging System
LipiScan Coronary Imaging System
The LipiScan Coronary Imaging System made its debut in Arizona at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. The new technology uses near-infrared imaging to help detect lipid core-containing plaque in the heart. LipiScan is used on heart patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. It enables physicians to see inside a blood vessel to assess the fat content of the plaque built up on the wall of the coronary arteries. Knowing the composition of the plaque can help physicians provide appropriate treatment for managing the patient's coronary artery disease. Lipid core-containing plaque cannot be detected by commonly used tests such as treadmill exams and coronary angiograms. It is believed to be "vulnerable plaque" or fatty plaque that ruptures to form dangerous blood clots. Such plaque is suspected of causing most sudden cardiac deaths, strokes and non-fatal heart attacks. "The ability to detect vulnerable plaque may go a long way in providing information to help prevent heart attacks in the future," said David Rizik, MD, medical director of Invasive Cardiology at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. To learn more about Heart & Vascular Services at Scottsdale Healthcare, visit http://www.shc.org/heart.
Get Your Gown On Prostate Cancer Awareness
Get Your Gown On Prostate Cancer Awareness
Get Your Gown On is a new health education campaign from the Arizona-based Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. Directing individuals to http://www.getyourgownon.org/, it aims to raise awareness about the need for regular prostate cancer screenings and the success of early detection and treatment of the disease. The campaign features former Arizona State University football star, National Football League Hall of Famer and prostate cancer survivor Michael Haynes encouraging men 40 or older to have a prostate exam as part of an annual physical. Haynes discovered he had prostate cancer following a screening exam in 2008. Now a prostate cancer survivor, he encourages men to talk with their doctors about getting tested for this deadly disease. Statistics show prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. Without early diagnosis, one in 36 will die from the disease. Prostate cancer the second-leading cause of cancer death in men, behind lung cancer. Visitors to http://www.getyourgownon.org/ can sign up for a free screening, read stories about Phoenix-area prostate cancer survivors, provide comments about prostate cancer detection and cancer treatment, and learn more about the innovative cancer treatment, research and support services available through the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. The nonprofit Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare established its leadership in personalized medicine by offering comprehensive cancer treatment, research, prevention and support services in a single location, working in collaboration with top community oncologists and scientists from leading universities and research institutions. The nonprofit Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center holds Accreditation with Commendation from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. Accreditation with Commendation is awarded to top cancer programs demonstrating the highest levels of cancer clinical services, research, community outreach, quality improvement, leadership and data management, according to the Chicago-based Commission on Cancer. http://www.shc.org/cancer
Heart Attack Miracle Recovery
Heart Attack Miracle Recovery
Phoenix firefighter Mike Glennie began walking to and from work to boost his cardio conditioning. He felt great and was happy that his workouts were producing results. Then something went wrong. On May 28, 2010, Mike did not make it home. Without any warning, he suffered a massive heart attack and dropped to the ground. Mike was defibrillated on site and taken to a nearby Phoenix hospital in a coma and carcinogenic shock. He needed more specialized care, and was airlifted to Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. The 55-year-old had to be resuscitated three times before a pulse was found. Surgery was the only option for his survival. Hypothermia treatment protocol began in the intensive care unit, cooling his body so Mike would be stable for open heart surgery. Next, an angiogram was performed and displayed several blockages. Two days passed while Mike's family, friends and firefighting colleagues waited by his side. There seemed to be little hope. On May 30, Scottsdale Healthcare cardiovascular surgeon Michael Caskey, MD performed a successful five-bypass surgery. Mike woke shortly after surgery completely mentally intact, progressed well and went home 12 days later. "They tell me I should not have lived," he says. "The nurses all told me that I was a fighter, although I don't remember most of it." Today, experts can't find anything wrong with his heart and Mike has returned to doing what he loves―"driving big red." "The team at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center was incredible. We are so grateful to all who treated me. My wife, extended family and I were always treated with the upmost respect, compassionate care along with smiles of encouragement," says Mike. "I'm living my life. It's not going to live me," he adds. For more information about Heart & Vascular Services at Scottsdale Healthcare, visit http://www.shc.org/heart.

Arizona's 1st Magnet Health System
Arizona's 1st Magnet Health System
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (July 26, 2011) -- Scottsdale Healthcare announced today it is the first multihospital health system in Arizona to achieve elite Magnet recognition, an achievement shared with fewer than 25 other multihospital health systems in the United States. Magnet recognition is considered the ultimate benchmark for consumers to measure the quality of care they can expect to receive in a hospital and the gold standard for nursing excellence and patient care, according to the American Nurses Credentialing Center, a division of the American Nurses Association. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital were officially designated as Magnet hospitals during a conference call with Scottsdale Healthcare nurses and American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Director Craig Luzinski, RN. "Magnet recognition is the most prestigious distinction a healthcare organization can receive for nursing excellence and quality patient care," said Scottsdale Healthcare Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer Peggy Reiley, RN, PhD. "It is an incredibly difficult honor to achieve because the standards are set so high with emphasis on outcomes, innovation, technology, evidence-based practice and patient partnerships." Nursing staff and leaders at each Scottsdale Healthcare hospital completed detailed interviews over four days of site inspections with Magnet surveyors, and submitted more than 5,000 pages of documentation for the locally-based nonprofit hospitals to be considered for Magnet recognition. According to the American Nurses Credentialing Center, Magnet hospitals: - Report higher patient satisfaction rates. - Have staff who spend more time at patients' bedsides. - Deliver better patient outcomes. - Have shorter lengths of patient stay. - Have lower patient mortality rates. - Consistently outperform non-Magnet organizations. The American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet recognition is awarded to hospitals deemed to be "magnets for nurses" for introducing more training programs and mechanisms for nurses to have a greater say in patient care. It was developed to recognize health care organizations that provide nursing excellence. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Centers were redesignated as Magnet hospitals; both received the prestigious recognition in 2006. Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, which opened in 2007, recently was surveyed for the first time and awarded Magnet recognition. "I couldn't be prouder of our staff members and our organization," said President and CEO Tom Sadvary. "Magnet recognition is more than an honor. It tells our patients and community that they can expect nursing excellence, teamwork, quality outcomes and a satisfying healthcare experience when they come to Scottsdale Healthcare." "Magnet recognition is a tremendous accomplishment for Scottsdale Healthcare, and a true testament to our world-class patient care," said Reiley. Magnet Facts: - Magnet recognition is the nationally acknowledged top honor for nursing care. - Only 21 healthcare systems in the nation have earned Magnet designation. - Scottsdale Healthcare (www.shc.org) is first and only provider in Arizona to earn Magnet designation for all of its hospitals. - Scottsdale Healthcare's Magnet hospitals include Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital. - Magnet recognition emphasizes quality patient care, innovation, technology and evidence-based practice. - Only the top 6% (386) of the nation's 5000 hospitals have earned Magnet designation. - Magnet recognition is awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, a division of the American Nurses Association. Scottsdale Healthcare is the community-based, nonprofit parent organization of Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute, and Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation. For more information, visit http://www.shc.org.
Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership
Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership
The Scottsdale Healthcare Military Training Center in Scottsdale, Arizona is a 7,500 sq. ft. state-of-the-art facility where human simulators bleed and imitate battlefield trauma injuries in order to provide hands-on training to military medical personnel. It serves as the hub for Scottsdale Healthcare's Military Partnership, giving students hands-on experience during clinical rotations that include the Level 1 Trauma Center at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center. The facility also is used for training local paramedics and firefighters, as well as Scottsdale Healthcare staff members. Active duty and reserve units from across the U.S., including Hawaii and Guam, have trained in Scottsdale. Trainees have come from the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve, Army Reserve and Army National Guard. Trainees include military physicians, nurses, medics, OR techs, pharmacy techs, lab techs, respiratory therapists, physical therapists and mental health professionals, as well as medical administrative and logistics personnel. The Military Training Program offers training and experience in Trauma, Burns, Pediatric Trauma, Behavioral Health, EMS ride-alongs, air ambulance and more. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is one of the first civilian hospitals in the U.S. to provide military trauma training. The Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership has trained 1,000 service members since 2004. Through its Military Partnership, Scottsdale Healthcare also plays a key role in regional disaster preparedness. The non-profit community-based hospital system's partnerships with the military led to the creation of Arizona's Coyote Crisis Campaign regional disaster response exercise. Scottsdale Healthcare is the community-based, nonprofit parent organization of the Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation. A leader in medical innovation, talent and technology, Scottsdale Healthcare was founded in 1962 and is based in Scottsdale, Arizona. For more information: http://www.shc.org/militarytraining.
NICU Father's Day Story
NICU Father's Day Story
This heartwarming story about a graduate of the Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) was originally broadcast on Father's Day 2010. Former MLB star Quinton McCracken and his wife Maggie describe their experience as parents of a premature newborn and the care their son Isaiah received at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. Scottsdale Healthcare Shea's NICU provides advanced care for all newborns of any gestational age and care for mothers with high-risk pregnancies. The NICU has cared for babies as small as 460 grams, 25 weeks gestation and as young as 24 weeks gestation and weighing 700 grams. The 24-bed Level III NICU maintains state-of-the-art equipment and is staffed by neonatologists, neonatal nurse practitioners, specially trained nurses and respiratory professionals who provide 24-hour in-hospital coverage for infants requiring advanced levels of care. For more information visit http://www.shc.org/pediatrics. (Video courtesy of Fox Sports Arizona)
Thompson Peak Hospital
Thompson Peak Hospital
See the Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital built in less than a minute through time-lapse photography. Thompson Peak Hospital is now open at Scottsdale Road and Thompson Peak Parkway, north of the Arizona Loop 101 freeway. Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak is a new generation of hospital, offering high tech surgical and emergency services, yet designed for patient needs and comfort. It combines the best of both worlds -- the small hospital experience with the medical expertise of a larger facility. Serving the north Phoenix and Scottsdale areas, it is an accredited chest pain center and its surgical suites host the latest in robotic technology for minimally invasive surgery. The daVinci and Mako robotic surgical systems are just two examples of the state-of-the-art technology at Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital. Orthopedic, spine, vascular and general surgery are among the specialties available at Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital. A women's health unit is specially equipped to support the needs of those receiving surgical treatment for gynecologic cancer including ovarian, uterine and cervical cancer. Emergency Room wait times and more hospital information are available at http://www.shc.org.

Difference Between Trauma Center & ER
Difference Between Trauma Center & ER
The Level 1 Trauma Center at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is a regional resource providing comprehensive emergency care during the crucial first hour following severe injury. Treatment at an appropriate facility during that 'Golden Hour' can mean the difference for better outcomes and survival for trauma patients. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is a Level I Trauma Center verified by the American College of Surgeons, the highest level of verification for U.S. trauma center capabilities. Level I Trauma Center verification means trauma specialists are 24/7, including orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, cardiac surgery, thoracic surgery, hand surgery, microvascular surgery, plastic surgery, obstetric and gynecologic surgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology and urology. Hospitals without these resources frequently transfer patients to Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn. Level I Trauma Centers must have the capability to provide total care for every aspect of injury from prevention through rehabilitation. They also must have a major commitment to education, research and planning. This includes support for surgical residency programs and postgraduate training in trauma for physicians, nurses and emergency medical services providers. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is better positioned than most for providing trauma care. In addition to our highly talented local medical professionals, the hospital's Military Trauma Training Program helps increase its ability to respond to disasters and benefits soldiers overseas in harm's way. For more information, visit http://www.shc.org. (Video courtesy azcentral.com/Arizona Republic)
Preparing for a Trauma Patient
Preparing for a Trauma Patient
See and hear how staff at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center prepares for the arrival of a critically injured patient in its Level I Trauma Center. Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center is a Level I Trauma Center verified by the American College of Surgeons, the highest level of verification for U.S. trauma center capabilities. Level I Trauma Center verification means trauma specialists are available around the clock, including orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, cardiac surgery, thoracic surgery, hand surgery, microvascular surgery, plastic surgery, obstetric and gynecologic surgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology and urology. Hospitals without these resources frequently transfer patients to Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn. Hospitals like Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center are prepared for the entire continuum of care for every aspect of injury from prevention through rehabilitation. They also support education, research and planning, including support for surgical residency programs and postgraduate training in trauma for physicians, nurses and emergency medical services providers. For more information, visit http://www.shc.org. (Video courtesy azcentral.com/Arizona Republic)
Heart Surgery Patient Reunion
Heart Surgery Patient Reunion
The Galleria of Fine Hearts is a reunion of open heart patients with Scottsdale Healthcare surgeons and hospital staff, presented by Scottsdale Healthcare Heart and Vascular Services. It is a poignant, emotional and fun event. Patients, doctors and hospital staff visit with each other without the stress of the life-changing events that brought them together in the first place. The Scottsdale Healthcare Galleria of Fine Hearts is not only a way to say "thank you" to our patients for entrusting us with their care, it is especially rewarding for hospital staff to see them happy and healthy. In this video, you'll meet four special patients who tell their stories: Bill Schmidt, who among other things has performed as a comedian, had a defective aortic valve that led to an aneurysm requiring surgery to avoid a ruptured aorta and virtually instant death. Bill's extensive nationwide search for a surgeon ended with Robert Riley, MD, who replaced his bicuspid aortic valve with a valve from a pig heart. Dr. Riley also replaced Bill's ascending aorta and aortic root. Ahwatukee resident Karen Graf didn't want heart surgery to keep her from her passions—raising her children and teaching the students at her school. A routine checkup to the discovery of a tumor on her heart's mitral valve. Using a minimally invasive approach, Rajeev Kathuria, MD removed the tumor through an incision less than 2 inches long. Scottsdale Healthcare's dedicated nurses also helped speed Karen's recovery, making sure she did the walking and deep breathing necessary after surgery to prevent complications. Najeba Gorges had recently settled in Phoenix and life was good until she began to feel pressure and tightness in her chest. She was referred to Scottsdale Healthcare cardiologist Walid Alami, MD, who discovered three completely blocked arteries in her heart. Just five months after arriving in America, Najeba underwent a life-saving operation performed without any complications by Scottsdale Healthcare cardiac surgeon Kenneth Ashton, MD. Phoenix firefighter Michael Glennie was walking home from work when without any warning, he suffered a massive heart attack. Paramedics resuscitated him three times before a pulse was found. In a coma, he was taken to Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center where a cooling catheter was placed for therapeutic hypothermia to save heart muscle. Dr. Joseph Klag then implanted an Impella heart assist device in the cardiac catheterization lab to help the heart pump more efficiently. Dr. Michael Caskey then performed a quintuple coronary bypass surgery. Incredibly, Mike went home 12 days later. For more information about Heart and Vascular Services at Scottsdale Healthcare, visit http://www.shc.org.
Immunizations are Important for Families
Immunizations are Important for Families
Immunizations are one of the easiest ways to protect your newborn from preventable diseases, but babies need several vaccinations over time to develop full immunity. In this brief video, Scottsdale Healthcare nurses Lynn Untermeyer and Lori Satran explain the importance of the "cocoon effect" when it comes to immunizing families with newborns. A newborn's mother and father receive their immunizations to protect their baby and explain the importance of receiving the vaccines. Babies are vulnerable to diseases such as whooping cough during the first months after birth. Adults and teens also need booster shots to help prevent others from becoming ill and spreading whooping cough to infants. The number of whooping cough cases in Arizona nearly doubled from 2009-2010, with thousands of babies were diagnosed. Talk to your physician today about getting up to date on your boosters. For more information visit http://www.shc.org/pediatrics.

Investigational cancer treatment study
Investigational cancer treatment study
A new investigational drug designed to stop cancer cells from reproducing may offer hope for patients with advanced solid tumor cancers. Clinical trials of TKM-PLK1 for qualified patients are now open at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. TKM-PLK-1 targets a protein called polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) that promotes tumor cell reproduction. It prevents the tumor from completing cell division, resulting in death of the cancer cell. The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare will be among the first in the world to study the treatment in humans. The new drug is being developed as a treatment for patients with advanced solid tumor cancers who are not well served by current therapy. The Phase 1 clinical trial will evaluate the safety, tolerability and how the body metabolizes TKM-PLK1. Laboratory research showed the investigational compound may have effectiveness in treating colorectal, breast, non-small cell lung, and ovarian cancers. These diseases collectively affect more than 500,000 new patients each year in the United States. Individuals seeking information about eligibility to participate in clinical trials at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare may contact the cancer care coordinator at 480-323-1339, toll free at 1-877-273-3713 or via email at clinicaltrials@shc.org. For more information about Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinial Trials, visit http://www.shc.org/clinicaltrials.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
Scottsdale Healthcare is home to Arizona's largest hospital-based hyperbaric oxygen chamber, which seats up to 12 patients, as well as a single-patient mono chamber. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a medical treatment which is used for treating certain medical conditions including chronic wounds and carbon monoxide exposure. The patient breathes 100 percent oxygen at the same time his or her body is under increased atmospheric pressure. The increased pressure and oxygen concentration aids in healing, though treatment effects vary per patient. In the multi-person hyperbaric chamber, patients can watch television, a movie, listen to the radio, read or just rest. The Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment and Wound Managment Center is located at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center. For more information, call 480-882-4965 or visit http://www.shc.org.
Military Medical Training Center
Military Medical Training Center
The Military Training Center at Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center houses a high-tech teaching facility. Mock battlefield operating rooms and intensive care units include life-like patient simulators with pulses, breathing and abdominal sounds, the ability to talk and respond to medications, and other functions including various trauma "injuries" that actually "bleed." Physicians, surgeons, nurses and other military medical personnel gain necessary skills and experience to successfully perform under wartime conditions and during humanitarian relief operations. For more information, visit http://www.shc.org/militarytraining.
ER for Kids
ER for Kids
A new Pediatric ER and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit are now open at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. The 10-bed Pediatric ER is located in a separate area away from adult patients. It is staffed by board-certified emergency physicians and pediatric-trained nurses. Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center is located at 9003 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale, Ariz. 85260. For more information on the Pediatric ER, visit http://www.shc.org/pediatrics. Check ER wait times and see more info at http://www.shc.org.

Little Miracles in the NICU
Little Miracles in the NICU
Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center The Northeast Valley's most critically ill newborns and mothers-to-be with high-risk pregnancies can now receive care closer to home, at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. Level III designation means that Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center's NICU can now provide the most advanced care for all newborns of any gestational age and offer care for mothers with high-risk pregnancies. (Our NICU has already cared for babies as small as 460 grams, 25 weeks gestation and as young as 24 weeks gestation and weighing 700 grams.) The 24-bed Level III NICU maintains state-of-the-art equipment and is staffed by neonatologists (physicians who take care of premature babies or sick infants), neonatal nurse practitioners, specially trained nurses and respiratory professionals who provide 24-hour in-hospital coverage for infants and families who require advanced care. Learn more at http://www.shc.org/pediatrics or call 480-882-4636.
Stand Up to Cancer
Stand Up to Cancer
Pancreatic cancer clinical trials are underway at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. The center is a primary clinical research site for the Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) Dream Team pancreatic cancer research project. Daniel Von Hoff, MD, chief scientific officer at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare and physician-in-chief at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is co-leader of the Stand Up to Cancer pancreatic cancer Dream Team. Ramesh Ramanathan, MD is the medical director at Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials. "Cutting Off the Fuel Supply, A New Approach to the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer" clinical trials include: • Using a drug to break through the tough coating surrounding the cancer so a second drug can kill the cancer cells. This combination is showing positive preliminary results in actually shrinking tumors. • Another effort is examining a tumor's molecular profile using state-of-the art molecular profiling techniques to personalize treatment for individual patients. Cancer patients travel from across Arizona, the United States and beyond for treatment at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. The center opened in 2001 as the first major cancer center in greater Phoenix to offer comprehensive cancer research, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and support services in a single location. To learn about eligibility to participate in clinical trials at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, contact the cancer care coordinator at 480-323-1339, toll free at 1-877-273-3713 or clinicaltrials@shc.org. For more information about current studies, visit http://www.shc.org/clinicaltrials.
Philanthropy supports our mission
Philanthropy supports our mission
Generous philanthropic support from the community enhances patient programs and services at Scottsdale Healthcare. Among the projects initiated by the community is a managed endowment created to keep programming and technology on the cutting edge. The impact of philanthropic support can be seen throughout all Scottsdale Healthcare facilities. For more information, contact: Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation 10001 N. 92nd Street, Suite 121 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 480-882-4517 or 866-592-7423 (toll free) http://www.shc.org
About Scottsdale Healthcare
About Scottsdale Healthcare
Scottsdale Healthcare is the not-for-profit parent of Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center and the Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute. We are based in Scottsdale, Arizona and led by a volunteer board of directors comprised of leading local citizens. Our non-profit community-based mission, to provide the highest quality and most compassionate care for all individuals, reflects the very premise on which Scottsdale Healthcare was founded in 1962. A leader in medical innovation, we serve the greater Scottsdale and metro Phoenix area, and our reputation for quality attracts patients from across Arizona and beyond. Scottsdale Healthcare also offers clinical and research services not typically found in community healthcare systems, as well as ambulatory surgery centers, home health services, and a wide range of community health education and outreach services. Our compassionate staff members and expert physicians are dedicated to providing world-class patient care. Supporting Scottsdale Healthcare's staff in providing patient and family-centered care is a corps of volunteers who donate more than 155,000 hours of service each year. Scottsdale Healthcare is a part of our community. Part of its families. Part of its future. And we wouldn't have it any other way. Learn more at http://www.shc.org.

Women & Heart Disease
Women & Heart Disease
The signs and symptoms of heart disease can be different for women. It's important to know your cholesterol breakdown, blood pressure, body mass index and blood sugar. Coronary artery disease is the number one killer of US women, claiming the lives of more than a half million women each year. More women die from heart disease than from all types of cancer combined. Cardiovascular disease kills and disables more women than men. All three Scottsdale Healthcare hospitals Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital are accredited as Certified Chest Pain Centers, recognizing the quality care provided to chest pain patients and collaboration with local emergency medical services. Chest Pain Center designation affirms that Scottsdale Healthcare has coordinated training and care between local emergency medical service providers and the hospitals emergency departments, cardiac cath labs and cardiologists in treating patients with chest pain and heart attacks. Learn more at http://www.shc.org. To schedule a consultation or Heart Health Evaluation at Scottsdale Healthcare, call 480-323-3663 or email abramini@shc.org.
Community Benefit at Scottsdale Healthcare
Community Benefit at Scottsdale Healthcare
Scottsdale Healthcare President & CEO Tom Sadvary provides background on the hospitals' community benefit in this nonprofit category vignette from the Scottsdale Chamber 2009 Sterling Awards. Learn more about Scottsdale Healthcare at http://www.shc.org.
Get Back in the Groove
Get Back in the Groove
Former major league baseball pitcher Tom Candiotti is the owner of a perfect game -- in bowling. In fact he's a bowling Hall of Famer. After knee pain sidelined him from enjoying some of his favorite activities, he turned to Scottsdale Healthcare Orthopedics for a total knee replacement. Learn more about Tom's knee replacement at http://www.shc.org/ortho
Get Back in the Saddle
Get Back in the Saddle
Scottsdale Healthcare Orthopedic Services are designed to get you back to your normal activities as soon as possible. Throughout all areas of orthopedics, skilled surgeons work closely with nursing staff and therapists to form a healthcare team that provides patient care and communicates effectively with both you and your family. Amateur golf champion Betsy Bro, former National Football League (NFL) kicker Nick Lowery, and avid horseman Mario Gomez are three of our former patients that have had successful surgery with Scottsdale Healthcare Orthopedic Services. Read our patient testimonials and information about our services by visiting shc.org/ortho. For more information on any of our Scottsdale Healthcare Orthopedic Services, contact us at: 1-866-969-8526 or OrthoInfo@shc.org

Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare
Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare
The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare opened in 2001 as the first major cancer center in greater Phoenix to offer comprehensive cancer research, diagnosis, treatment and support services in a single location at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. Through our partnerships with community physicians, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and others, the patient and supportive care services you deserve have never been easier to access. Our Cancer Care Coordinators are experienced advanced practice nurses with expertise in oncology. From the time youre diagnosed, this nurse coordinator is available as a dedicated member of your cancer care team and will facilitate personalized cancer care for you and your family. Learn more at http://www.shc.org. To contact a Cancer Care Coordinator, Call: 480-323-1255 (toll free 1-877- 273-3639) Email: ccc@shc.org
More Than Hospitals
More Than Hospitals
Scottsdale Healthcare is more than hospitals, our care and compassion extends into the community in many ways. We're an integral, and active, part of our community. As the only locally owned nonprofit healthcare system serving greater Scottsdale and northeast Phoenix, we provide many wellness, training and outreach services—even during challenging times when others scale back. Our earnings are reinvested back into services and facilities that benefit our community. This video offers an insightful look at just a few of Scottsdale Healthcare's community benefit efforts, including: - Services provided through the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare - Neighborhood Outreach Access to Health (NOAH), which provides medical, dental and other care to those in need - Medical and trauma training programs including the Scottsdale Healthcare Military Partnership, which provides military medical personnel with training that can save soldiers' lives and enhances our preparedness for disaster response - Recycling efforts and our partnership with Scottsdale Training and Rehabilitation Services to enable adults with developmental disabilities to gain independence, self-esteem and valuable job skills To learn more about Scottsdale Healthcare, visit http://www.shc.org.
daVinci Surgical System Demo
daVinci Surgical System Demo
If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a condition that may require surgery, you owe it to yourself to learn about all of your medical options, including the most effective, least invasive surgical treatments available. The daVinci® Surgical System provides surgeons with an alternative to both traditional open surgery and conventional laparoscopy, putting a surgeon's hands at the controls of a state-of-the-art robotic platform. The daVinci System enables surgeons to perform even the most complex and delicate procedures through very small incisions with unmatched precision.